Liquidation of UFO Researchers

Liquidation of UFO Researchers 1

Otto Binder – who died on October 13, 1974, at the age of sixty-three – is most remembered for his work in the field of superhero comic-books. He wrote for DC Comics’ “World’s Finest Comics” and “Mystery in Space,” Marvel Comics’ “Young Allies,” and Fawcett Comics’ “Bulletman,” amongst many others. As someone who finds superhero stuff to be utterly ridiculous, I’m pleased that Binder did more than just focus his time on spandex, cloaks, masks, and stupid “super-powers.” He was also the editor of Space World and had a deep interest in UFOs. In 1967, Binder’s book What We Really Know About Flying Saucers was published.

All of which brings me to the crux of this article. In May 1971, Binder penned a feature for Saga magazine. Its title was “Liquidation of the UFO Researchers.” As you might guess – and guess correctly – the article was focused upon alleged mysterious deaths within the field of Ufology. It began in eye-catching fashion:

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“Over the past 10 years, no less than 137 flying saucer researchers, writers, scientists, and witnesses, have died – many under the most mysterious circumstances. Were they silenced, permanently, because they got too close to the truth? Before the 1967 Congress of Scientific Ufologists, Gray Barker, the chairman, received two letters and one phone call telling him that Frank Edwards, the noted radio newscaster and champion of flying saucers, would die during the convention. One day after the meeting was convened there was an announcement that Frank Edwards had succumbed to an ‘apparent’ heart attack. How could anybody know that Edwards was going to die, unless it was planned?”

As someone who has written a full-length book on the subject – Close Encounters of the Fatal Kind – I don’t doubt at all that there have been some very odd deaths within Ufology. Of course, we have to remember that we’re all human, and we’re all on a time-limit. So, it’s important to realize that the vast majority of people within Ufology who once looked up at the stars, but who are now six-foot-under or in an urn above the fireplace, did not die under unusual and/or suspicious circumstances. They died because they were human. But, that does not take away the fact that there have been far more than a few odd demises in the field of flying saucers.

Otto-Binder-570x744-compressor
Otto Binder’s portrait by Bill Schelly.

Why am I mentioning all this now? For the following reason: Otto Binder’s article is now available for a new audience, and in a new package. Two years after Binder wrote his article, Gray Barker, of Saucerian Books, published it in the form of a small book, along with a body of additional material. That book has just been republished by New Saucerian Press, who tells us the following about their new edition:

“New Saucerian is pleased to reprint an original Saucerian publication from 1973, ‘Liquidation of the UFO Investigators: The Truth Behind the Flying Saucers’ Mission to Earth.’

“In these pages, Otto Binder reports on the strange disappearances and deaths of several UFO researchers. He also zeroes in on the mysterious Virginia psychic and UFO percipient, Ted Owens, who claimed to be in direct telepathic contact with the ‘space intelligences’ and the Men in Black (MIB). Could Owens, wonders Binder, hold the key to understanding and dealing with such dangerous cosmic interlopers?

“This special edition features an Introduction by John A. Keel, a Foreword by Kurt Glemser, and both an Introduction and Afterword by the editor, Gray Barker. Also included is a chapter by Ted Owens himself, explaining how he came to be a tool of the space intelligences, or “SIs.”

“Owens clearly had demonstrable PK (psychokinetic) powers, and was able to predict and even change the courses of hurricanes, tornadoes, and sporting events. Did Owens really set off the eruption of Mount Saint Helens in 1980, and if so, why couldn’t he blow up the flying saucers, and stop the killings perpetrated by the SIs and MIB?

“Over the years, many authors have tried to duplicate the material in this book, often claiming the material for themselves. Make no mistake: this is the original source material. Upon reading, one finds that very little new material on this subject has been added to what Binder originally discovered, making it a must-have for today’s serious UFO/Fortean researcher. The topic is still as hot – and unexplored – as it was 50 years ago.”

If that has caught your attention, and you want to find more about this highly controversial aspect of Ufology, you can purchase the new edition right here. The final word goes to Otto Binder, as it should: “…something must account for the high death rate among UFOlogists. That ‘something’ may either be the secret machinations of the UFO hierarchy who decides which earth-people ‘know too much about flying saucers,’ or the planned removal of UFO crusaders who have done their job nobly. Take your choice.”

 

Source mysteriousuniverse.org

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